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Salvadoreñx Que Ondas . My pronouns are they/them/their and I'm genderfluid. I'm Lenca. I'm an Artist.Writer.Curator. Art Historian. Boston based. Here in this blog will be posting of art that isn't made by white people, music I dig, haifa wehbe n j.lo posts, posts about me navigating the art world and global politics. lots of posts concerning central america/ns. I also run Salvadoranarthistory and CentralAmericaContemporary on this site.


My friend Chloe confirmed I snore by recording me but i sound mad cute. someone sign me.

— 4 hours ago with 3 notes

THIS MOTIVATES ME SO MUCH. BLESS NY LATINXS

(Source: anustartpop, via medranochav)

— 5 hours ago with 15 notes

cavetocanvas:

Mickalene Thomas, Tamika Sur Une Chaise Longue, 2008

cavetocanvas:

Mickalene ThomasTamika Sur Une Chaise Longue, 2008

(via medranochav)

— 5 hours ago with 113 notes

izotecipotx:

Sonia Balassanian| Armenian-Iranian 

Baby-Girl 1993

— 6 hours ago with 15 notes

izotecipotx:

Nina Mangalanayagam | Sri Lanka
photograph from “Homeland” series | 2008 | Copyright Nina Mangalanayagam. Courtesy Institute of International Visual Arts, London.
The series “Homeland” (2008) shows the artist with her family at home in Sweden, engaged in typical national activities—mushroom picking, decorating the Christmas tree, painting Easter eggs—her Tamil father seemingly having reached some degree of accord with his adopted country; the artist, though, seems more equivocal, even confused. The true extent and nature of integration are left unresolved. x

izotecipotx:

Nina Mangalanayagam | Sri Lanka

photograph from “Homeland” series | 2008 | Copyright Nina Mangalanayagam. Courtesy Institute of International Visual Arts, London.

The series “Homeland” (2008) shows the artist with her family at home in Sweden, engaged in typical national activities—mushroom picking, decorating the Christmas tree, painting Easter eggs—her Tamil father seemingly having reached some degree of accord with his adopted country; the artist, though, seems more equivocal, even confused. The true extent and nature of integration are left unresolved. x

— 7 hours ago with 30 notes

#i wanna curate her  #interiores 

"Excuse me, are you part of the exhibit? Cuz You’re breathtaking" if I had a nickel… -_-

— 10 hours ago with 6 notes

#smh  #museum job problems 

centralamericacontemporary:

Juan  Carlos  Mendizabal y Radio  Free  Clear Light Collective | El Salvador | U.S Diaspora

(Itzpapalotl)  Mariposa  Negra | 2012-2013

Mixed  media  video  installation  booth  | SOMArts

From  the  Artist:  

I  left El Salvador in 1981 after  my  mother and I were arrested in the middle of the night by the military. We were released several days later and my mother was given “no  promise of life.” My  grandmother quickly whisked us away to the airport    and  we  arrived  in  San Francisco, where I have  spent  the  majority  of my life. I have visited El  Salvador  many  times  since  that sudden departure  but I feel that I live in between two worlds–not quite American, not quite  Salvadoran.      

When I was a boy, I knew El Salvador was my home.  The  streets were  familiar  and  my sense  of  identity  was  rooted  in  the  oppressive  heat,  the  jungle and  the  shadow  of  the  ever-­‐ present volcano. That    plane  ride  in  1981  blurred  the  meaning of home  and  identity–I no longer  fit there, yet I  am  not    quite right here  among  the  fog  and  clouds. I walk in  both  places  like  a ghost,  unable  to  completely  move  on,  unable  to  return. I have  known  many  immigrants  who  feel  the  same  way. Although the  Peace  Accords were  signed  in 1992 and technically  there is no war, I can never return to the  identity  that    was  left    behind. That place  within the symbolic  order  has  vanished.  

Itzpaplotl  was  created  not only  to  represent,  but    to  actually  re-­‐create    the  experience  of  a    shift    in    identity.  The  booth  stands  in  for  the  human  body.  Within  this construct one can observe the isolation  and  subjectivity  of  the  senses  of perception. It is  through these  senses that a    notion of identity is formed. When the perceptions are altered, the identity shifts correspondingly.     

The  images  appearing  on  the  monitors  are  composed  of  footage I captured in El Salvador  along    with excerpts from the movies and cartoons I enjoyed as a boy and iconic scenes from the civil war.    Drawing  from my 20 years of  experience as a composer  and  electronic musician,  I have composed an accompanying  soundscape to  be  experienced in tandem with the visual elements.  

(Source: izotecipotx)

— 16 hours ago with 25 notes

#GO OFF 

izotecipotx:

As a curator, I’m responsible for a lot. I did a studio visit with Josúe Rojas who isn’t just a fellow artist but a really good friend. We like chat and eat in his studio and just share stories and resources and laughs. Anyway we got to the topic of this important exhibit he was part of Mourning and Scars: 20 Years after the Salvadoran Civil War. This is probably the biggest group show that was only Salvadoran-American artists. The art pieces that were included I consider all of them to be top notch and amazing. My favorite was the piece by Juan Carlos Mendizabal. Anyway although the exhibit was important to have, we both talked about the title of the exhibit. Josúe felt like every salvi art show that happens in cali is either war or mara themed n it’s marketed super weird. I think as a curator, I never wanna outwardly be like “come to our show, REVISITING CORPSES” or some shit like that. It’s a weird self-exotification I feel. I think the show mourning n scars itself was great. It actually wasn’t just art with dead bodies n gang tattoos. It was very varied and beautiful. Each art piece was so different and you really felt that it was super personal for each artist. it carried real lived experiences. It was just the title that irked me. It took away from the show I felt. Some of the art was hopeful. It was all just “mourning and scars” I’m not talking shit, I think it was  amazing. It’ll be a show I reference time and time again, I just wish the title was different and given better thought. It’s something I definitely always wanna keep in mind. Exhibition titles can really fuck things up I.E “Permission to be Global” for a contemporary latin american show  and like “women photographers from the arab world n iran” lol bt then EVERYTHING was war or hijab/niqab . like I think curators have the responsibility to not just avoid putting in shitty art but presenting the artists in a genuine way. I thought the photo show I just mentioned was great as in every artist’s voice individually but the curation was awful and kinda exotified them for a western audience. As if women from these countries had no other concerns.It was super orientalist curating. it was careless. in terms of the latin american, all the artists actually got mad at the title n even explained why but Jen Mergel just said “oh these artists didn’t understand what i was saying, i’m gonna leave it as the title” also the underlining arrogance of the latin american show when it was missing central america n most of the carib so it was like presenting itself as visionary but like so full of problems n lazy avoidance of research.so yeah thinking about exhibition titles is really important if your a curator. I value the conversations I have in my artistic community. That studio visit was so important. I think Interiores had a lot of art about post-war, war experiences but it wasn’t all just dead bodies. Only one piece had violent content out of 11 pieces. It was an exhibit looking at different ways in a salvadoran context we can explore what “interior/s” are. Some of the pieces were about materials doing that, some were physchological, some referenced architecture etc but yeah it had layers. after hearing patricia belli talk about how in the 90’s the global art world EXPECTED super explicit violent art from Central America and talking in person with Regina Galindo over the same like yeah so many thoughts. You have to be careful curating things. The show can be amazing but a title can totally steer it into bad zones. It can take away. Don’t fuck up a title. Be in conversation about it always.

— 16 hours ago with 7 notes

#edited it 

Baddi Eesh by Haifa Wehbe 

— 19 hours ago with 2 notes

#haifa wehbe  #la haifa  #carefree day 
centralamericacontemporary:

José Toledo | Guatemala
Eco | JT03011 | 2011

centralamericacontemporary:

José Toledo | Guatemala

Eco | JT03011 | 2011

— 1 day ago with 3 notes

Frida Kahlo’s fucked up for mixing and matching clothing from different indigenous cultures that aren’t hers and for taking her maid’s clothes and trying to play it off as some solidarity or w.e I like do not like her as a person. she was super fucking disconnected and didn’t reconnect properly. so much light skin privilege and class privilege like ugh. i wish people held her accountable. I can’t stand seeing her outfits anymore. 

— 1 day ago with 64 notes

reggievaval:

Big Pun - I’m Not A Player

— 1 day ago with 405 notes

Ana Mendieta | Cuba | U.S Diaspora
Untitled in Old Man’s Creek Iowa | 1977

Ana Mendieta | Cuba | U.S Diaspora

Untitled in Old Man’s Creek Iowa | 1977

— 1 day ago with 12 notes

#she completey changed my art practice i'll always be in debt  #Ana Mendieta  #Cuba